Fake Antivirus Software: The Tool for Preventing Cyber Attacks Transforms in the Tool for Cyber Attacks

Fake antiviruses do exist and, sometimes, they look even better than real antivirus programs. Fakes always find the security hole in your computer, so they are described with the term Scareware. Scanning is free, but you’ll have to pay to clean the system of “detected threats.” When you pay, cybercriminals receive your credit card information in addition to money. These details are enough for starting the identity theft process. So, you can address the IDShield review to find the safeguard against such risks and protect your data.

Fake antivirus is big business. Often, such fraudulent products have technical support and a hotline. A major difference between these fraudulent programs and the script described by the reader is that fake antiviruses don’t really work. Their scanner works faster than conventional antiviruses because it doesn’t really check anything. In addition, the model of free scanning and paid cleaning is not common among real security solutions.

The vendor needs to pay in most cases to include the product in the laboratory test program. This is why some developers of free solutions do not participate in tests. If you’re worried about the security of your data, choose a free solution that is systematically tested. You can always opt for AVG, Avast, Bitdefender Free, and other lab-tested antivirus programs. You may check this out and learn more about BitDefender antivirus.

Constant Researches

Scareware programs are designed to steal money. A running antivirus program that has malicious functions is another matter. Fortunately, it will be very difficult to create something similar.

Independent antivirus laboratories such as Dennis Technology Labs, AV-Comparatives, AV-Tests subject antivirus programs to serious testing. Their main task is to assess the effectiveness of protection, but many tests can detect malicious behavior.

Let’s give an example. One sign of bot infection is suspicious traffic between the computer and the remote server. Antivirus laboratories analyze network traffic in detail, so they can easily recognize a fraudulent antivirus program running on this model.

The vendor needs to pay in most cases to include the product in the laboratory test program. This is why some developers of free solutions do not participate in tests. If you’re worried about the security of your data, choose a free solution that is systematically tested. You can always opt for AVG, Avast, Bitdefender Free, and other lab-tested antivirus programs.

How Does Fake Antiviruses Act?

The first and most important thing everyone should know is that a real antivirus will never ask for money for virus treatment. If the solution finds malware or Trojans, it’ll cure them. If the license is over, it will simply either stop looking for viruses or stop downloading new updates, that is, stop protecting against new viruses, but will still find and treat old ones. So if “antivirus” asks for money to cure the virus, it’s fake antivirus. Everything is simple. There can be no other options.

These fake antiviruses look very similar to real antiviruses, and their messages are very obnoxious and frightening. They pop-up every 5-10 minutes to inform you that your device is infected and needs to be cured urgently, and you have to pay for it.

Naturally, these viruses mentioned by the fake antiviruses are not on the computer. They simply choose random non-infected files on the computer and say they are infected with the virus, and the name is picked accidentally from a list of “scary” names.

Without Financial Effect

Most vendors offer a whole range of products: from free antivirus to an all-in-one solution. They profit when the user moves from a free program to a commercial solution or buys other types of products to protect the same vendor. The large distribution of free antiviruses allows the creation of an extensive client base for paid products and positively affects the promotion of the brand. The rejection of this concept in favor of the creation of spy antivirus is completely unthinkable.

However, there remains a possibility that any antivirus is spying on users not to extort money, but to steal private data. You need to think twice before installing a brand new antivirus from a questionable region, such as North Korea.

It is not necessary to be afraid to install popular free antiviruses from famous vendors. The user gets more confidence when the developer has a longer history. Important information is more likely to be lost by data leakage than by “bad” antivirus.

 

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